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11

It's pretty simple, you just append your key to the URL as a parameter. For example, looking for users 1 and 5: http://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/users/1;5?site=stackoverflow&key=YOUR_KEY_HERE So, it looks like your HTTP.call would become: HTTP.call ( "GET", urlString, {params:{site:"stackoverflow", key:"YOUR_KEY_HERE"}}, function (...


9

Yes, you can change very nearly everything (and actually everything that's user entered) about an application after it's been registered. You should use the domain you intend to host the client-side app under as your OAuth Domain. While not strictly necessary, it's the sanest option.


7

You cannot do this. A delete feature has been requested and requested again (with status-planned given about 3.5 years ago). Register your desire for this by immediately upvoting these posts: Deleting an application key? How to delete an OAuth (2.0) API key? (Theoretically, if those feature requests get enough upvotes, they might get some developer love.)...


6

You can see your apps, that you registered with the registration page, by going to: stackapps.com/apps/oauth This page is different for every user and you will be forced to log-in to see it. The only place I have ever found this link is in a sidebar on Stack App's home page:


5

The X-RateLimit-Current header contains the requests you have left that particular day. The X-RateLimit-Max dictates the total amount of requests your app can make in total through that day. See the bottom two response headers in the screenshot.


4

"When I requested the Key I provided application site. What is purpose of this site ? Can it be just my home page, git account or a personal blog ? Or do I need to implement some functionality on this site ?" As far as I know, the application site field exists purely for documentational purposes. You can provide the name of your blog or a GitHub page if you ...


4

You can find the page listing all of your v2.0 and v2.1 keys here: https://stackapps.com/apps/oauth


3

The page where you can find the API key for your registered application says that the key doesn't need to be kept secret: [The key] is not considered a secret, and may be safely embed [sic] in client side code or distributed binaries. Abuse is typically an issue for the end-user, so you shouldn't be concerned about it beyond recognizing backoff responses ...


3

Reference: Stack Exchange API Authentication Looking for a beginner's tutorial to using the API Yeah the registration form now says, "Website URL is required". So, if you don't have your own website: Enter stackexchange.com as the Application Website. Enter stackexchange.com as the OAuth Domain. This will allow you to use https://stackexchange.com/...


2

It depends on what profile information you need to display. Basically anything in a user's profile that's public-facing is exposed via the API and requires no action on behalf of the end-user. Starting with v2.0 of the API, you have limited access to some private user information (such as the their full reputation history) through the OAuth 2.0 methods. In ...


2

key is your app key, access_token identifies a user (and a set of permissions) and is what you get at the end of an authentication flow. Keys are not secret, for example here's what the Documentation Console's registration looks like: You can find your app key by going to Manage Your Applications (in the Stack Apps homepage sidebar) and selecting one of ...


2

This is what the /apps/{accessTokens}/de-authenticate route does. Passing valid access_tokens to this method causes the application that created them to be de-authorized by the user associated with each access_token. This will remove the application from their apps tab, and cause all other existing access_tokens to be destroyed. (Emphasis added) So if ...


2

This is status-bydesign. From the Date Formats doc page: For convenience when doing ad-hoc queries without a key an alternative date format is accepted: YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS, where the hour, minute, and second values are optional. Applications should not ship using this date format (as all applications should ship with a key), it is provided just to ...


1

Not only is that possible, but we do it all the time. No one can see the apps you register at stackapps.com/apps/oauth/register except you (and the SE devs). If you don't need OAuth, then you can enter just about any fake information in the required fields. This still allows you to use the key to get 10K quota. It is only when you want to access ...


1

You don't need a server to get an API key, or even to use OAuth2. Set OAuth Domain to: stackexchange.com, and Application Website to: https://stackapps.com/. See this other answer for more information.


1

I think you can just create an app and mark it as a placeholder. Those are for apps that don't quite work yet, but need a registered Stack Apps post for testing. Incomplete posts are allowed for placeholder apps, so you don't need to fill in all the details. While this might be bending the rules a bit, as long as it doesn't cause an avalanche of ...


1

Yes, it is perfectly okay. You only need an access_token (OAuth/login) if you are trying to change data, or are accessing private information for a logged-in user. See the Authentication docs for more info. The issue you are having with has_more is unrelated and is a known, current, bug. Aside: Using an access_token will never decrease any secondary ...


1

For one use the current API version (2.1) instead of an old one (1.1 in your case). Furthermore, when using JSONP you do not have to parse the result. The data object you get in your success method already is a JavaScript object you can work with. $(function(){ $.ajax({ url: 'http://api.stackexchange.com/2.1/search?page=1&pagesize=15&tagged=...


1

The API expects JSONP requests to specify the callback as the jsonp parameter, not the callback that jQuery uses by default. While really you should consider upgrading to API 2.1, which does expect callback (and allows CORS, for that matter), you can fix your code by putting in the jsonp parameter placeholder: $.ajax({ url:'http://api.stackoverflow....


1

Answer: Yes they are the same. Officially now, since app-key was made a synonym of api-key.


1

You're right, this is not very well documented. OAuth Domain is the domain of the URL where users are redirected after authenticating themselves. You specify this URL in redirect_uri parameter of your authentication query. The doc says: redirect_uri - must be under an apps registered domain and also The user is redirected to redirect_uri, with these ...


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