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5

Refer to the Stack Exchange API, Authentication docs. It looks like you are trying to authenticate using either a server you do not control, or a local server that is not on the public internet. Crucial Points: Do not specify a redirect_uri to any server that you do not control!!! When you use something like redirect_uri=https://www.yahoo.com/, then a ...


4

Your second call must be https:. You actually got an error like: "error_id":406, "error_message":"Access token sent over non-HTTPS request, it has been invalidated", "error_name":"access_token_compromised" On the first attempt. Only subsequent attempts, with the same token, would yield the 'key' is not valid for passed 'access_token' error. When ...


3

I forgot to add the scope in the authentication url according to this document https://api.stackexchange.com/docs/authentication#scope 1.Send a user to https://stackexchange.com/oauth, with these query string parameters ◦client_id ◦scope (details) ◦redirect_uri - must be under an apps registered domain ◦state - optional


3

So, this was a fun one. :) We apparently broke several different things over the course of a year that went unnoticed until Google turned off OpenID support. In no particular order but for fun and posterity: Facebook OAuth authentication just straight up didn't work. It broke back in January of 2014 when the code was accidentally changed from function ...


3

Yes, I always get 86399 too. And, no, you can't specify an interval other than no_expiry. But you can call /access-tokens/{accessTokens}/invalidateDoc at whatever interval you wish. So, for less user annoyance, set no_expiry but then call /invalidate every, say, 8 days, for example.


2

Yes, it can be annoying that the API docs, the javascript SDK, and the settings pages use the terms: "Explicit" "Implicit" "Server side" "Client side" a little interchangeably. (The first 2 are roughly synonymous with the last two.) From the javascript SDK docs: Your application must have the client side OAuth flow enabled, and must not have the ...


2

Refer to the API Authentication doc page, where it says: explicit grant (is) for server side applications Also, see What is the difference between the 2 workflows? and related questions. Basically, unless you have your own web server (and usually your own domain), use the implicit flow. The implicit flow merely requires either a web browser or a ...


2

The authentication process is described in the API docs: http://api.stackexchange.com/docs/authentication.


2

I faced the same issue when I was using the stack exchange API to post a message to stack overflow website. I figured I had to post my application on a domain name. I hosted my application on free domain provided by 000webhost.com. You may wish to take a similar approach. After deploying the application on the domain, change the oauth domain and the ...



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