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5

The name 'key' is a bit misleading. It is not your 'license', it is simply a means of controlling anonymous access to the api and to gather usage metrics. So, while there is no value in advertising your key, there is no need to be concerned with it's visibility in your application code.


5

The X-RateLimit-Current header contains the requests you have left that particular day. The X-RateLimit-Max dictates the total amount of requests your app can make in total through that day. See the bottom two response headers in the screenshot.


4

There is no direct integration into Drupal, even from any of the existing API libraries available. To clear up the confusion: The API provides you access to the API interface, hosted by Stack Exchange which you can then use to develop software against and provides you with readonly access to the content of the Stack Exchange sites. Since your using ...


3

Yes, you can change very nearly everything (and actually everything that's user entered) about an application after it's been registered. You should use the domain you intend to host the client-side app under as your OAuth Domain. While not strictly necessary, it's the sanest option.


3

I think you should register a Key. Quoting the Key documentation: When should I use a key? The No Key limit is meant for light experimentation and simple development work. The instant you need the higher limit, it is acceptable to register for a key.Your application does not need to be in a releasable - even an alpha - state. I would also ...


3

Don't worry too much about leaking your key. Its not the end of the world. Remember, throttling and bans are done based on IP. The key is basically for identification purposes. Only in cases where the vast majority of the users of a key are abusive would we consider banning the key itself.


2

StackAuth does not currently have an API request limit. You really shouldn't be hitting it more than once a day though, for site information, and in accordance with general API guidelines for associated users. Both of which can be safely cached quite heavily. Eventually some sort of throttling scheme will be put in place.


2

It depends on what profile information you need to display. Basically anything in a user's profile that's public-facing is exposed via the API and requires no action on behalf of the end-user. Starting with v2.0 of the API, you have limited access to some private user information (such as the their full reputation history) through the OAuth 2.0 methods. In ...


2

key is your app key, access_token identifies a user (and a set of permissions) and is what you get at the end of an authentication flow. Keys are not secret, for example here's what the Documentation Console's registration looks like: You can find your app key by going to Manage Your Applications (in the Stack Apps homepage sidebar) and selecting one of ...


2

The page where you can find the API key for your registered application says that the key doesn't need to be kept secret: [The key] is not considered a secret, and may be safely embed [sic] in client side code or distributed binaries. Abuse is typically an issue for the end-user, so you shouldn't be concerned about it beyond recognizing backoff ...


1

For one use the current API version (2.1) instead of an old one (1.1 in your case). Furthermore, when using JSONP you do not have to parse the result. The data object you get in your success method already is a JavaScript object you can work with. $(function(){ $.ajax({ url: ...


1

The API expects JSONP requests to specify the callback as the jsonp parameter, not the callback that jQuery uses by default. While really you should consider upgrading to API 2.1, which does expect callback (and allows CORS, for that matter), you can fix your code by putting in the jsonp parameter placeholder: $.ajax({ ...


1

"When I requested the Key I provided application site. What is purpose of this site ? Can it be just my home page, git account or a personal blog ? Or do I need to implement some functionality on this site ?" As far as I know, the application site field exists purely for documentational purposes. You can provide the name of your blog or a GitHub page if ...


1

I think you misunderstand how request limiting is meant to function. An IP has a limit of requests per-day. By using a key in a request, an application can promote an IP to a higher request limit. Once an IP is at that higher request limit it stays there until the end of the day. At no point is an application drawing from a quota it owns (even paired ...



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